The primary problem with any Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement must always remain one of mutual recognition, the full, even if ever so grudging, acceptance of the other’s right to exist.

If both sides cannot accede to this single, overriding requirement, then there is no way for either to deal effectively with any of the outstanding issues that have long maintained their situation. Right-of-return, borders, compensation, Jerusalem, land swaps, security, all these are ultimately dependent on some fixed and final definition of what should be a future Israel and what a future Palestine.

And, since no decision-making process has emerged to accommodate so critical an outcome, the conflict must rumble on until one does. But, if the conflict is set to continue, then no such determination can be reached and, for that very reason alone, some means of ending the matter must now be found.

Nearly seven decades of signal failure in this endeavour has allowed the problem to grow stronger and ever more virulent. Even today, with yet another and more resolute peace initiative in transit, expectations of its success are still very much in doubt.

So, in order to remove such doubt and create an absolute certainty of closure, some method that goes far beyond all previous attempts must be applied.

To do less will be an admission of defeat and thus the greatest insult to our own generation, to those of the past and, especially so, of the future.

To do more, I think, cannot be possible.