Metro is a free newspaper handed out on major UK transport networks and other outlets. It has a readership of millions. This is its front page today:

metro160115Once again, a European Jewish community has been targeted by Islamist terrorism, this time in the Danish capital Copenhagen. For Metro, however, the story isn’t about 37-year-old Dan Uzan, murdered as he stood guard outside a synagogue.

No, it’s all about Benjamin Netanyahu and the opportunity to turn his call for European Jews to make Aliyah into the issue of the day. And splashed all over the front page no less.

And what about The Guardian? Simon Tisdall is the assistant editor and a foreign affairs columnist. His reaction to the Copenhagen terror attack reveals so much about the current trend of thought that still blames the victims for the terror.

Some choice excerpts:

The Copenhagen gunman may turn out to have a similar background [to those of the Paris terrorists], and likewise to have been a lone loose cannon. No terrorist group has claimed responsibility. But the febrile backdrop against which this individual’s crime took place is only too evident: a shooting war with Islamists across large swaths of the Muslim world, growing Islamophobia in western Europe, ever greater polarisation over Israel-Palestine – especially since last year’s Gaza conflict – and a linked rise in antisemitism.

In The Guardian’s universe, it is western actions and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that are the motivators for young Muslims in Europe to seek out Jews to kill along with cartoonists and media that they disagree with. No responsibility whatsoever lies with the perverted and fascistic ideology of Islamism that has been propagated through radical preachers and promoted with Saudi and Qatari cash.

To further buttress his willful blindness, Tisdall writes:

David Cameron and Barack Obama lined up on Sunday to defend these values [freedom of speech and religion]. They might be more usefully employed in acknowledging that many current problems can be traced back to the Anglo-American destabilisation of post-2003 Iraq and to the west’s connivance in the suppression of Arab spring pro-democracy uprisings.

But perhaps most insultingly, Tisdall concludes:

In the short term, calls for increased security for frightened Jewish communities, including in Britain, are wholly understandable. Muslim communities deserve similar consideration.

Both Jews and Muslims deserve to live their lives in Europe. But only Jews are being murdered on the streets of European capitals simply for being Jewish. That The Guardian and Simon Tisdall believe that there is some false equivalence between Jewish and Muslim communities in Europe demonstrates just how warped their ideologically inspired view of this serious situation is.

Both Metro and The Guardian just don’t get it.