It’s one thing for a people to have survived for over 65 years surrounded by others whose official policy is to favour their removal rather than accepting them as fellow residents in the region.

It’s quite another to make use of such widespread hostility by sensing in it a means of gaining permanent status in a neighbourhood over which so much blood and treasure has already been spent.



Establishing legitimate and settled title to any part of this ‘neighbourhood’ has long been the one, overriding factor that prevents even minor repairs being made to a situation fuelled by so much violence and despair. The subject simply refuses to submit to negotiation, arbitration, consensus, judicial review or decades spent in conflict over the issues it has raised.

The question that arises is this. Is there anything else that could take on so formidable a task?

If not this, then what is there left but to continue on much as before, knowing all the while that no solution will ever be found, the only firm expectation being that the future must now turn out to be even darker than in the past.

The true test of a people is not measured in how hard they are prepared to fight for a cause; it’s finding out and taking whatever risks are needed to make sure that cause is one that is still worth fighting for.