US Secretary of State John Kerry (R) and Palestinian chief negotiator Saeb Erekat wave before a meeting with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas at the presidential compound in the West Bank city of Ramallah January 4, 2014. (photo credit: Issam Rimawi/Flash90)

Secretary of State Kerry’s now fabled ‘framework for peace’ may one day become a reality but, given the odds against this as yet unknown quantity and the issues it must try to address, nobody should be holding their breath while waiting impatiently upon its immanent arrival.

But I would agree that a framework of sorts is very necessary here, some stable structure that allows for final disposal of problems so intractable that, for nearly seven decades of trial and error, error mostly, not even the smallest dent in their formidable armour has been seen.

If results are wanted within a reasonable time-span and with much less blood and treasure expended in the foreseeable future, then pussyfooting around with trade-offs, deals and other highly dubious offers and balancing acts is guaranteed to cause more harm than good to any halfway-decent peace proposal.

The overall situation has to be properly stabilised before any final agreement can be reached.

And stability has a price. Its name is fear but that of a very special kind, one never before experienced on this or any battlefield of similar stripe.

And, in such a manner, peace finally muscles its way into taking on the leading role in this apparently endless saga.

But hasn’t that been the primary objective, right from the very start?