The three Israeli hostages were found dead yesterday. On the one hand I was surprised, since I had some hope and belief of a positive chance that they will return alive. But on the other hand, yesterday I was completely apathetic. I was apathetic partly because this incident reminded me of other violent events such as the kidnapping of Eldad Regev and Ehud Goldwasser, who were kidnapped in 2006. I was apathetic because I had a phrase running in my mind – “people died before them, and people will die after them.”

Yesterday at 2 am I walked by the prime minister’s house, which is close to my apartment. All the gates were locked and sourounded by many guards. It was clear what was happening in this small building, and probably underground. Difficult discussions, full of natural vengeful impulses and feelings of anger, exhausting discussions shrouded in cigarette smoke, which will probably intensify the cycle of violence.

The IDF will, perhaps, respond by bombing the Gaza Strip. In response, terrorists will launch Qassam rockets from Gaza towards Sderot, Israel will start a massive military operation, Palestinian terrorists will send terrorists into Israel to blow themselves up, the Americans will intervene and things will calm down for a few months.

Then the current Israeli government will expand the settlements, peace negotiation will freeze again, Israelis will be caught off guard by another kidnapping of Israelis (even if not in Israeli territory), the prime minister will say that he won’t talk to Hamas, but ultimately — for the sake of the hostages’ return — he would be willing to negotiate with this extremist organization and release murderers, and will continue weakening the moderate voice (Abbas). Then one of the sides will again use violence, whether in military operations or terrorist activity.

Yesterday, something which was written by MK Moshe Feiglin on his Facebook page concerning another matter caught my eye. Something on which I uncharacteristically agreed with him. Referring to criticism that was leveled at the Minister of Education, Feiglin said that “force does not create legitimacy, but creates rejection”.

So YALLA Feiglin, show us, along with your party, how you apply this sentence not only towards Rabbi Piron, but also in the actions of the government that your party is leading, also towards the Israelis and also towards the Palestinians.