Harvard University for Soborno Isaac

To be accepted into Harvard is almost impossible. There is a five percent acceptance rate. Of the 50,000 highly qualified applicants, only 2,000 will get in. To get a letter from the president of Harvard seems beyond impossible. And when you are only 6 years old, that letter becomes historic.

President Thomas Isekenegbe Interviews Soborno Isaac, here

Soborno Isaac received two letters from the Vice Chancellor of Oxford University, Dr. Louise Richardson.However, he didn’t cry when he read those letters. But his eyes filled with tears when he read President Faust’s letter. His mother’s reaction was unforgettable: “There are so many presidents, prime ministers, Nobel laureates, and college professors who have loved him for his ability to be able to solve Ph.D.-level math, physics, chemistry, and computer science problems. But none have moved him like President Faust.

February 22, 2017. I was teaching mathematics at Bronx Community College in New York City. In the middle of the class, I saw a message on my phone from my wife: “Soborno has received a letter from Dr. Faust, the president of Harvard University.” I turned off the phone and tried to focus on teaching calculus. However, I struggled to write anything on the chalkboard. “Professor, is everything OK?” one of my students asked. “Yes, everything is fine,” I responded. However, it turned out that everything was not fine, and I had to dismiss class early. “I have a family situation, guys. See you Thursday.”

To get a letter from the president of Harvard seems beyond impossible. And when you are only 6 years old, that letter becomes historic, here

It’s 15 minutes from Bronx Community College to my home. But today I was flying. When I arrived home, I saw that Soborno was crying. So were my wife and my eldest son, Refath Albert Bari. I too failed to hide my tears, and we all cried together. However, this was not the first time we had cried together.

I worked for 14 years as a security guard, here, all over New York City, including at the City College of New York (CCNY). On April 1, 2016, I received a request from President Lisa Coico of CCNY, asking to carry out an interview with Soborno. The memory of President Coico seeing me standing up in the Marshak  Building as a security guard (as did Michio Kaku) back when I didn’t even have the audacity to tell her about my son reduced me to tears. President Coico took over three hours for the interview, testing Soborno’s skills in mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Dr. Coico was so impressed by his performance that she compared him with Sir Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein. I didn’t go home that day. Instead, I went to the Marshak Building to share my feelings with the lobby security guard: “Only a few months ago, I was a security guard sitting exactly where you’re sitting now, but today the university president carried out an interview with my four-year-old son and called him the ‘Einstein of our time.’” He gave me a big hug and told me that in no other country in the world could a story like this happen except America.

On my way home, I thought this was all just a dream. However, when Soborno received a request for an interview from Dr. Ricardo Fernandez, the president of Lehman College, I started thinking that this must be the reality. BronxNet broadcast the interview, and the response was immediate. Many people carried out interviews with Soborno after that, including President Thomas Isekenegbe of Bronx Community College. Dr. Isekenegbe was so impressed by Soborno’s performance that he posted the news on social media.

A few months later, Soborno received a letter from President Barack Obama,here. My wife called me home because she was too scared to open the envelope. It took me half an hour to open the envelope. We started reading. We paused when we became too emotional and then tried to read it again. Learning about how proud he and Michelle Obama felt of Soborno filled my eyes with tears. On December 10, 1929, in Calcutta’s Albert Hall, the Bengali people gave a grand reception for Kazi Nazrul Islam, their most illustrious son. Some 88 years later, on January 13, 2017, they gave a similar reception to the four-year-old Soborno Isaac Bari for receiving recognition from President Obama. Many people have written to Soborno since then, including the FBI Director, the president of Pennsylvania University, the president of Stanford University, the chancellor of the City University of New York, the chancellor of Germany, the president of France, the UN secretary-general, the speaker of the British Parliament, and University of Cambridge and many more. Recently, he has received letters from Buckingham Palace and the White House.

Why would the whole world keep pouring its love and affection on a six-year-old boy? Has he won the Nobel Prize? No. Has he received a Nobel Prize nomination for his work on Black-hole? Many Nobel laureates, college presidents, and heads of state have praised Soborno, so is it possible that multiple people have nominated him for the Nobel Prize? Is the Queen considering him for a knighthood? Is President Trump considering him for the Medal of Freedom? Many people believe Soborno will win all three. It does not seem humanly possible to win all three prizes. In fact, no one has received all of them. But Soborno’s story is different and doesn’t match anyone else’s story. So let’s begin his story:

Story #1 : From Soborno Pathik to Soborno Isaac

It was April 11, 2014. Soborno had just turned 2 years old. While my family was celebrating his birthday, I received a message on Facebook from Mahfoozur Rahman, an aeronautical engineer: “Change your son’s name from Pathik to Isaac because he possesses the gift of Sir Isaac Newton.” I initially ignored the request, but ended up changing the name after a series of events, here

Soborno was 2 years old, solving addition problems with my wife. I was busy grading my students’ papers in another room. All of a sudden, my wife called out, “Soborno is saying something that we never taught him before.” When I asked Soborno, he said, “If 1 +1 is 2, then n + n must be 2n!” I became so surprised that I started giving him math lessons a few times a day.

Story # 2: Einstein of our time

The City College of New York is one of the most prestigious engineering schools in the United States, which is why I was surprised when he received an interview request from President Lisa Coico. In fact, April 21 became a historic day because in that four-hour-long interview, as a 4 year old, he solved over 80 advanced-level math, physics and chemistry problems. Time TV broadcasted his interview with President Coico, which was viewed by millions around the world.

This is why, I was not surprised when we received another interview request from Engineer Golom Mowla of the Federation of Bangladeshi Associations in North America. However, this time, Dr. Mizanul Chowdhury would conduct Isaac’s interview in front of thousands of people in FOBANA. Dr. Chowdhury is the most recognized Bengali scientist of our time.

He teaches physics and computer science at MIT and writes programs for NASA Space Station robots. I was told that many public officials would be in the audience, including Congresswoman Barbara Comstock. On September 3, 2016, we arrived in Washington two hours before the interview. Soborno was exhausted, but did well in the interview and solved many PhD-level math problems. Congresswoman Comstock was impressed and called him to chat with her after the interview. That interview went viral on social media, and Soborno became a 4-year-old math-and-science superstar. Congresswoman Comstock, on Dec 23rd, 2016, shared the documentary on her official Facebook Page and wrote, “This was a highlight of the year — a 4 year old, Soborno Isaac Bari, solving complex math problems. Can’t wait to see what exciting things he will be solving in the future!”

But later, Soborno Isaac realized that if everyone in the world were to fall in love with math and science, there would no longer be terrorists, and we wouldn’t need an anti-terrorist website. Hopefully, Soborno can inspire millions of youths (especially his fans) to fall in love with something even more important than politics and religion—that is, of course, math and science. Soborno’s dream is to get into Harvard at the age of 10 via the SAT. He wants to get into college at such an early age not to make any records but to earn four doctorates by the age of 40 so that he can solve five problems: Black-hole, string theory, dark matter, quantum computing, and making fusion a reality. He also wants to create Nazrul, the most advanced robot to colonize Mars, and he wants to create a world without terrorism, all of which is outlined in his upcoming book The Love.

Story # 3: Recognition from President Obama

A few months later on November 9, 2016, my elder son — Albert, who is a 15-year-old Brooklyn Tech student, one of the most prestigious high schools in America — and I were sad because our candidate had lost the election a day earlier. To forget and move on, I took Soborno to Lehman College so they could solve some math problems. Everything changed a few hours later when Albert knocked the classroom door and informed me that Soborno had received a letter of recognition from President Obama. I was so happy that I forgot what had happened the night before (Trump won the election, by defeating Hillary). I looked at Isaac and saw him jumping up and down.


On behalf of 400 million Bengalis, New York’s Bangladesh Press Club and Time Television gave Isaac a huge reception in Jackson Heights, New York, in honor of the recognition he received from President Barack Obama for being able to solve Ph.D.-level math, physics and chemistry problems at only 4 years old, here

This recognition from the White House changed his life. When I announced it on Facebook that he had received a letter from President Obama, it made headlines in every single newspaper in Bangladesh except Prothom Alo. He was on the front page of almost all the Bengali newspapers and became the headline of all the TV channels. Yet the most important part was that his story spread a positive message around Bangladesh—namely, that an education can pave the way to get recognition from the president of the United States. People started realizing that education not only pays off but also can make someone famous regardless your background.

On November 26, 2016, at 9:00 p.m., millions of parents in Bangladesh sat along with their children in front of television (Channel 24)  to fall in love with math and science by watching , Einstein of our Time (খুদে আইনস্টাইন), an Ahsan Himel documentary based on Soborno Isaac’s journey. By the time the movie ended, many parents expected their children to follow Soborno Isaac’s path. His story has also inspired millions of youths around the world including Zahid Jeebon and Kadir Chowdhury Babul. Zahid and Kadir never met with Isaac but when they spotted the 4-year-old Soborno Isaac’s picture on the front page of Kaler Konto, a leading newspaper in Bangladesh, their eyes filled with tears and they decided to promote his story around Bangladesh. Zahid published a book, তোমার হাতে আলোর মশাল : খুদে আইনস্টাইন সুবর্ণ আইজ্যাক, and Kadir founded “Soborno Isaac Math & Science Lab” at Sunshine Pre-Cadet High School.

Story # 4: Sheikh Hasina and Soborno Isaac

Bangladesh faced its worst terrorist attack on July 1st, when Bengali Muslims were getting ready to celebrate Eid, signifying the end of Ramadan. The scope of this terrorist assault was unimaginable because such atrocities never take place in Bangladesh. The terrorists even entered the Holey Artisan, a bakery famous for its bagels and coffee, at 8 p.m., and opened fire indiscriminately, killing many innocent people, including two adolescents: Tarishi Jain, a 19-year-old girl, and Faraaz Hossain, a 20-year-old boy. The terrorists vowed that this was “only the beginning of the storm” to punish Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, who wanted to separate religion from the state by removing Islam’s status as the state religion from the Bangladesh Constitution. Soborno movie  “I’m Muslim & I love America,” inspired millions of youths to rise against terrorism.

In the wake of this terrorist attack, I received an urgent message from the Embassy of Bangladesh in Washington, DC. “We want to visit your home to meet with Soborno,” said Dr. Samia Israt Ronee.I did not tell her that Isaac had been sick for days due to seasonal flu, concerned that they would think I was using it as an excuse to avoid them (It is widely known how critical I used to be of Sheikh Hasina Wazed, the current Prime Minister of Bangladesh. As a former biographer of Muhammad Yunus, a Bangladeshi social entrepreneur and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006, I published many articles and books criticizing Sheikh Hasina’s action against Yunus and Grameen Bank. Many Yunus’ supporters used my book, “Grameen Social Business Model,” to gain momentum against the anti-Hasina movement). What’s more, when the Prime Minister sends her delegates to your home, it’s not appropriate to turn them down. It was Monday, April 3, 2017. I dismissed my class at Bronx C. College early to arrive home before 6 p.m. Dr. Samia Ronee and fellow delegate Mohammad Abdullah Al Mamun arrived at our home at 8 p.m. and began to check Isaac’s math, chemistry and physics ability.Despite being extremely sick, Isaac wrote all the elements from the periodic table on the board in less than two minutes. They both were stunned. Then they asked Isaac to solve a calculus problem, which Isaac solved correctly with great enthusiasm. They were surprised by Isaac’s handwriting.  “Do you want our Prime Minster to meet with Isaac in New York or Bangladesh?” Al Mamun asked me before he left. My response was prompt, “Bangladesh.”

Story #5:  I’m Muslim and I Love America

The story goes back to 2012, when Soborno Isaac was in Washington D.C. to give an interview for Voice of America. We left New York for D.C. at 5:00 a.m. He was scheduled to be interviewed by VOA at 11:00 a.m., and we arrived in the capital some 30 minutes late. Our heart was racing as we parked the car in front of the Smithsonian Institution wondering if Sabrina Dona would still be waiting for them. I ran toward the VOA elevator, carrying Soborno Isaac. The security officers stopped us and asked is to go through the metal detector. As we were complying, I noticed that many of them were staring at us. Then, when they were searching Soborno Isaac body, I realized that something was wrong.

Our eyes turned to a TV monitor on the wall adjacent to the metal detector. I saw the two terrorist brothers, Said and Cherif Kouachi, armed with AK-47s, forcing their way into the Charlie Hebdo building. I had seen a similar incident on December 16, when seven terrorists entered a Pakistan Army School and killed over 130 school children. My whole body quivered and my heart dropped; I hoped with all my heart that this time, the perpetrators were not Muslims. After all, I was a Muslim. However, not 10 seconds later, I heard “Allahu Akbar,” and my heart broke into a million pieces. The security person, who was still searching Soborno Isaac, looked at him and asked, “What does that mean?” He did not reply. He was speechless. Finally they let us enter the building, after the Voice of America management showed up in the lobby.

Not only that time, but a few months later, we were in the NYU Bobst Library, solving math problems together, as we always do. However, we were interrupted by the breaking news of terrorists killing innocent foreigners in the Bangladesh Holy Artisan restaurant. One of the people watching in the room with us was Katy, an NYU student who was plagued by the ideology that all Muslims were bad. She went home traumatized by the constant stream of Muslim terror attacks in the United States. We went home traumatized for a different reason: not only have these terrorists killed innocent human beings, they have propagated and fed the sick idea that Muslims are synonymous with terrorists. On the way back home, Soborno said, “Dad, you should make a speech to condemn the cruel behavior of these terrorists.”

The day began with Isaac and me going to the Mosque on the 3rd of July, which is the eve of American Independence Day. As we walked into the public park space where the prayer was held, Isaac was very jolly, ready to celebrate Independence Day. All of a sudden, he asked me, “Dad, can I ask Imam to pray for America?” I didn’t expect it from him, because he is just five years old. So I looked at him, surprised, but reluctantly said, “Go ahead,” in a hope that he would not have the audacity to do such a thing in front of hundreds of people. But, the exact opposite happened.

In the middle of the prayer, Isaac suddenly stood up, and shouted, “Excuse me Imam, can you please pray for my country, the United States of America, because tomorrow is 4th of July.” As expected, the imam ignored him, and Isaac sat back down. On his way home Isaac looked very sad and wouldn’t talk. I asked him why he was so sad, and he asked me sadly “Dad, why didn’t the imam pray for my country in his monazat?”

“Forgive the imam,” I said. After going home, I wanted to solve some problems with Isaac, and I was explaining differential equations to him. However, I realized his mind was elsewhere. So, I asked him, “Why aren’t you paying attention?” His response shocked me once again. “Dad, I want to write a letter to George Washington.” “Why?” This time, I was very serious in the conversation with my five- year-old son. “I think the Founding Father deserves an apology from the imam. But since the imam will never apologize, I will apologize on behalf of the imam and 1.7 billion Muslims.” This time, I knew exactly what he was talking about. So I let him go ahead.

Isaac started writing a letter to one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, and its first President, George Washington. After Isaac showed the letter to me, I became shocked. How could a 5-year-old have the understanding and the mental capability to not only address the wrongs of a religious preacher to a Founding Father, but also try to change it by asking the imam to pray for the US, something no adult would dare to do. And then, it dawned on me.

The story goes back to 2012, when Isaac was in Washington D.C. to give an interview for Voice of America. I left New York for D.C. at 5:00 a.m., along with my son. He was scheduled to be interviewed by VOA at 11:00 a.m., and we arrived in the capital some 30 minutes late. My heart was racing as I parked my car in front of the Smithsonian Institution Wondering if Sabrina Dona would still be waiting for us, I ran toward the VOA elevator, carrying my son. The security officers stopped us and asked us to go through the metal detector. As we were complying, I noticed that many of them were staring at us. Then, when they were searching little Soborno’s body, I realized that something was wrong.

My eyes turned to a TV monitor on the wall adjacent to the metal detector. I saw the two terrorist brothers, Said and Cherif Kouachi, armed with AK-47s, forcing their way into the Charlie Hebdo building. I had seen a similar incident on December 16, when seven terrorists entered a Pakistan Army School and killed over 130 school children. My whole body quivered and my heart dropped; I hoped with all my heart that this time, the perpetrators were not Muslims, this time. After all, I am a Muslim. However, not 10 seconds later, I heard “Allahu Akbar,” and my heart broke into a million pieces. The security person, who was still searching little Soborno Isaac, looked at me and asked, “What does that mean?” I did not reply. I was speechless. Finally they let us enter the building, after the Voice of America management showed up in the lobby.

Not only that time, but a few months later, Isaac and I were in the NYU Bobst Library, solving math problems together, as we always do. However, we were interrupted by the breaking news of terrorists killing innocent foreigners in the Bangladesh Holy Artisan restaurant. One of the people watching in the room with us was Katy, an NYU student who was plagued by the ideology that all Muslims were bad. She went home traumatized by the constant stream of Muslim terror attacks in the United States. I went home traumatized for a different reason: not only have these terrorists killed innocent human beings, they have propagated and fed the sick idea that Muslims are synonymous with terrorists. On my way back home, Isaac said, “Dad, you should make a speech to condemn the cruel behavior of these terrorists.” “That’s a great idea, Isaac. We must address this issue soon.” “You know what, Dad, I’ll help you write your speech.” The next day, when I was taking Isaac to school, I found a draft in his pocket. I used the exact same draft to deliver the speech at Lehman College, watched by millions around the world.

The pieces must have joined together, for Isaac much the same way that they did for me. A few days later, after I made the speech (“Tears for Faraz and Tarishi”) at Lehman, the two brothers, Isaac and Albert were set to go to school alone, as they always did. And like always, I and their mother wished them farewell. However, as Isaac was walking on his way to school, he saw an American flag stuck under the tires of a black Honda. Its stars were bruised, and the stick holding the flag was barely keeping itself together under the pressure of the tires above. Isaac was disturbed deeply by seeing this, believing that this was an insult to the American flag. After many tries, he still couldn’t nudge the flag out from under the tire. He decided to wait until the driver came to move the car, so that he could save the American flag from being insulted. Time passed by, and it was almost 4 p.m. Albert was coming back from school and saw a boy who looked like his brother, sitting on a piece of chopped wood next to the black Honda. Albert ran, and saw that it really was his little brother.

Bewildered, he observed for a few minutes, dumbfounded, trying to process the situation. Then he yelled at Isaac. “Isaac! What are you doing here?” Isaac said, very nervously, “Albert, I didn’t go to school.” “Didn’t go to school?! Why?” Pointing to the flag, Isaac said, “I was trying to pull it, but I couldn’t, so I was waiting for the driver to come and move the car so that I could save the flag from being humiliated and bruised.” It made Albert so emotional, his eyes filled with tears, and he cried out, “Are you ok, my little brother?” “Albert, don’t tell it to Mom and Dad, please.” “OK, Isaac, I will not tell it to them. However, what I will tell them is that Isaac is on a mission to change the world.” Soon after, Albert helped push the car, and Isaac was able to save the flag from humiliation.

After Isaac came home, he asked me to take him to George Washington’s statue in Union Square, so that he could read the first President his apology on behalf of the imam, and the 1.7 billion Muslims who worship his religion. As Isaac began reading his letter to the Founding Father, “Dear Founding Father, I came here to say sorry… ”, many dozens of people had lined up around Isaac, hoping to take a few pictures with him. As the people dispersed, one of the people there was Kathleen Raab. She thanked Isaac for changing her perception on Muslims. And when Isaac asked why she wanted to take a picture with him even though he wasn’t a celebrity, Ms. Raab responded, “You might not be a celebrity, but you are a hero for people like me, whose whole view of the world has changed because of you.”

Another unforgettable event unfolded on the same day. As Isaac was walking with me through Times Square on Independence Day, he saw a guitarist performing on the street. Just a few seconds ago, we were discussing some of his math problems, but immediately, Isaac stopped me: “Dad, I need to go tell that man that he is singing the wrong song. It is the fourth of July, and singing anything but The Star-Spangled Banner” is not only disrespectful, but an insult to this great nation we live in.” After I gave him permission, Isaac ran to the man, Lawrence Rush, and shouted, “Stop the music!” Soon after, they began singing “The Star-Spangled Banner,” and many other people joined in with Isaac, to spread the patriotism.

These series of events convinced me to make this movie. I wanted to tell people this story, so that they get inspired by Isaac. But, how was I to do this if I wasn’t a writer, a director, or even had the necessary tools. And Isaac is a math and science hero, not a movie star.

He received recognition from President Obama for being able to solve Ph.D. level math, physics, and chemistry, not for acting.

So, I called my friends Kathleen Raab and Lawrence Rush and told them they had to act in my movie. What I did not tell them is that I don’t even have a camera. Instead, all I have is a broken iPhone that I’ve dropped so many times. I’m not even sure if it’s capable of recording anymore. In fact, most of the time, the shooting of the movie was done by Katy’s or Lawrence’s iPhone.

So, on the eve of Independence Day, we went to BCC to pay tributes to the Founding Father, where we met a photographer who took Isaac’s picture for the newspaper. He asked Isaac, “Why did you make this movie?” Isaac replied, “I made this movie to show that we don’t need more imams. We need more Al-Khawarizmis, not imams.”

Soborno Isaac solves math problem during Eid Namaz. “Loving Allah and loving mathematics are not two mutually Exclusive events” ~ A quote from Soborno Isaac upcoming book, “The ❣️”, here

On the way back home, I asked Isaac “Why don’t you do something for Bangladesh? You always do things for America” “If I change Bangladesh, I change only Bangladesh. But if I change America, I change the world.”

Story # 6:“I Love Christmas” gave birth to “The Love”

The day begins with Soborno Isaac, a 5-year-old Muslim boy who brings home a Christmas tree to celebrate December 25, the birth of Jesus Christ. However, there was a problem. His mother, a devoted Muslim, did not like the idea. The conflict between mother and son began heating up.

Isaac: Why can’t a Muslim celebrate Christmas, Mom

Mom: I don’t know, and I don’t need to know. All I know is I’m a Muslim, and Muslims don’t celebrate Christmas.

Isaac: I’m also a Muslim, Mom, and I love my religion, which is Islam. However, I’m also a Hindu, a Buddha, a Jew, and a Christian. I know we love Eid, but we should also love Yom Kippur, Saraswati, Buddha Purnima, and also Christmas. We should love all religions, and I think we should celebrate every holiday as our own.

The 40-year-old traditional mind was unwilling to accept the reasoning of a 5-year-old mind. As a result, Isaac’s mom threw the Christmas tree into a garbage truck. Isaac became enraged and left home, saying he would not return until he found his Christmas tree. On his way out, he wrote a very emotional letter to his mom in the lobby.

Dear Mom,

I love you, but I did not like you throwing out my Christmas tree. I know you are a Muslim; I’m a Muslim, too. However, I’m not only a Muslim but also a Hindu, a Buddha, a Jew, and a Christian. I love Eid, but I also love Saraswati, Magha Puja, Yom Kippur, and Christmas.

I love all holidays because whatever we can enjoy in human products should instantly become ours, including Eid and Christmas, regardless of their origin. As a Muslim, I am proud of my humanity when I can acknowledge the festivals of other religions as my own. We should all feel a great gratitude that every great holiday, including Christmas, is ours.

I know you are praying for me to find my Christmas tree. I love you, Mom.

Yours,

Soborno Isaac

While reading the letter, he caught the attention of singer Lawrence Rush. Lawrence liked the letter so much that he read it twice and was motivated to help Isaac find the tree. Meanwhile, Isaac’s mom realized her mistake, and she made a banner with Isaac’s quote: I’m a Muslim, but I’m also a Hindu, a Buddha, a Jew, and a Christian. I love Eid, Durga Puja, Buddha Purnima, Hanukkah, and Christmas. I belong to all religions, and every great holiday is mine, including Eid and Christmas.” She went to every single mall, holding up her banner in hopes of finding Isaac.

Lawrence and Isaac tried their best to find the Christmas tree, but they couldn’t find it. Lawrence gave up, but Isaac refused to give up and went home without his tree. It was Christmas Eve, and Isaac was sitting in Central Park reading his letter to his mom aloud.As the people dispersed, one of the people there was Kathleen Raab. She thanked Isaac for changing her perspective on Muslims.

When Soborno asked why she wanted to take a picture of him even though he wasn’t a celebrity, Katie responded, “You might not be a celebrity, but you are a hero for people like me whose entire view of the world has changed because of you.” They became friends instantly, and Kathleen offered him her help. They hired a horse carriage to take us all around the city in hopes of finding my Christmas tree. They found the tree in the Central Park.

His mother apologized to him and decided to celebrate Christmas. They have been celebrating Christmas ever since. This message of love has spread around the world, including to Bangladesh where a physics teacher Nahid Afzal & and his son Faiyaz and their friend Noman Lam decided to promote Isaac’s philosophy of acceptance and tolerance of all beliefs.

Nahid Afzal & and his son Faiyaz made 68,000 posters for the 68,000 villages of Bangladesh, here. The posters stated in Bangla, “I’m a Muslim, but I’m also a Hindu, a Buddha, a Jew, and a Christian. I love Eid, Durga Puja, Buddha Purnima, Hanukkah, and Christmas. I belong to all religions, and every holiday, including Eid and Christmas, is mine.”

Conclusion:

Soborno Isaac wants to plant a dream in the mind of every child in the world that they too can become the next Sir Isaac Newton or Albert Einstein by inspiring them to fall in love with math and science. It is almost impossible to accomplish this goal without exciting every child, which he will do by creating Nazrul, robot which will colonize Mars. He also wants to create a world without terrorism, through his movement The Love. He outlines his journey as an ambassador of science, tolerance, and love through his upcoming book, The Love.

No, he didn’t win the Nobel Prize (yet), he didn’t receive knighthood from Queen Elizabeth or  Medal of Freedom from President Trump. However, Soborno Isaac does not work for the recognition. He works for his dreams.

About the Author
Rashidul Bari moved to the United States in 2000. He is currently a doctoral student at Columbia University and he teaches mathematics at Bronx Community College. Email : rb3080@columbia.edu
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