Gaza’s children

It’s a known fact, if you want to take control of the minds and souls of a country, you start with the children. In this, Gaza excels, and they’re probably better at it than ISIS, Hezbollah, the Syrians and Iranians and all the other psychopaths living in the region combined.

In 1944, in a propaganda film, the Nazis presented Theresienstadt to the International Red Cross as a model Jewish settlement where the Jews lived an idyllic life. It was, in fact, a ghetto established to gradually transfer the Jews from Theresienstadt to extermination camps. The Red Cross representatives were conducted on a tour and fell for it hook, line, and sinker. The representatives apparently did not attempt to divert from the tour route on which they were led by the Germans, who posed questions to the Jewish residents along the way.

Hamas has learned well from the Nazis

This past Thursday, Will George in an article titled, “100 days on: Gaza’s children speak out” published in the British paper The Independent, wrote an emotional article about the children of Gaza: “Standing outside a youth centre in the north of Gaza, Mohammed, a confident 12-year-old says he works hard at sciences in school and has big dreams: “I want to be an astronaut, I want to be the first astronaut from Gaza.”

George adds:

“The situation is desperate. Around half of Gaza’s population of 1.8 million are under the age of 18 – and though 500,000 children are back at school that means hundreds of thousands are without education. Thirty thousand children were displaced by the fighting. The seemingly constant cycle of violence means that any child over seven has now lived through three wars. But amid the destruction, children still want to play – and they want to learn. According to the UN, the summer conflict left more than 250 schools damaged, 26 beyond repair. Parents and school teachers say they can all see the toll the violence is taking on Gaza’s children.”

Yet, there is another face to the children of Gaza that is rarely mentioned, if at all, in papers such as The Independent and The Guardian.  For over seven years the rulers of Gaza have abused their children through a systematic approach of instilling a hatred of Jews in the minds of their young children. Jews must be killed, the authorities tell their children. It is an abuse of gigantic proportions that continues today.

Unfortunately, George fails, for example, to make any references to Hamas’ cruelty directed at Gaza’s children. Such as the Hamas terrorist attack that not once, but three times burnt down a theme park built as much for Will George’s children as for the adults. Or that dozens of Hamas’ armed men who attacked a United Nations summer camp being set up for children in Gaza. Tents were set on fire and bathrooms vandalised. Or of the formidable brain washing techniques used by Hamas in children’s TV programmes that explain it is acceptable to kill Jews. Or the Al Jazeera report stating, “The Hamas government in Gaza is giving boys in state schools military-style training once a week. It starts with drills, and eventually they graduate to training using guns.”

Seven years ago on October 30, 2007, jewishinfoNews in Canada published the following article below. Today in Gaza, the sickness directed against its children continues. Nothing has really changed.

“A good or bad future of a nation can be determined by its children, who will lead the nation in the future.” – Palestinian Sociologist Ghassan Zoqan

Here’s  some of what Chinaview, the online new service of Xinhuah News Agency, had to say at the time:

In this northern Gaza Strip city, Raed Wahidi, 11-year-old boy in black uniform, was using his plastic pistol on Tuesday morning to fire at his friend, dressed in dark brown, who was also carrying a plastic rifle. What Wahidi and his friend did was part of a popular game that Palestinian children often play in the Hamas-ruled Strip.

But since mid-June when Hamas routed Fatah and seized control of the coastal Strip, political factor has began to change game playing — Wahidi represents Hamas and his friend, Ayman Muhssen, also 11 years old, acts as a member of Fatah.

“I’m Lieutenant Raed,  from the Executive Forces (of Hamas),” the boy identified himself, referring to Hamas’ paramilitary security forces which administrate the Gaza Strip since mid-June.

Muhssen broke in: “I’m Captain Ayman, from the Preventive Security Forces, which will return to Gaza stronger than ever and will crush you.”

The Preventive Security Forces was made up of Palestinian militants loyal to President Mahmoud Abbas’ Fatah movement, which suffered a fiasco in June during a bloody battle against Hamas’ Executive Forces.

Hamas’ Executive Forces and the Preventive Security Forces have been the symbolic parts of the infighting that ended with Hamas taking over Gaza.

As a result, the geographically-divided Palestinian territories have been politically split into two parts — with Hamas controlling Gaza and Fatah holding the West Bank.

Wahidi and Muhssen seemed to be addicted to their games, and it was very difficult to keep talking to them, particularly as their mates were calling them to continue the game.

“We have to blow up these bombs in the coup-maker group. They did the same with us yesterday but we could not respond because we have had no money to buy the bombs,” Muhssen said as he ran quickly to join his team.

He was referring to Hamas militants as the coup-makers, as it was what Abbas and his Fatah movement has repeatedly branded Hamas men.

Without blood and tears, the two game teams clashed as if it was a real battle. Muhssen’s firework bombs have forced Wahidi’s team back until they surrendered to Muhssen’s Fatah players. Though being tied up by the Fatah team, Wahidi was smiling and seemed not to be sad at all.

“It is only a game…”

“It is only a game. And in fact, Hamas is the dominant here,” he explained why he was not sad…

Sociologist Ghassan Zoqan said the children “demonstrate their own conception of life through the games and this is a normal issue.”

He, however, warned that continuing to see Hamas and Fatah fighters as enemy will increase the Palestinian social division in the future.

“A good or bad future of a nation can be determined by its children, who will lead the nation in the future,” he added.

Statistics over the impact of continuous infighting on Palestinian children show that 28 children have died in the Gaza Strip and West Bank in the period between January and August this year. Some 177 children aged under 18 were also wounded in this period.

The Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS) also said education in 75 schools has been interrupted between October 2006 and August 2007 due to the clashes between Hamas and Fatah.

According to the PCBS, there have been six incidents that saw Gaza gunmen storming schools and bombs were used in three cases.

No one can deny that the children of Gaza have dreams and aspirations similar to other children. Reporting on them is an acceptable and honourable task. But, George’s article for me plays right into Hamas/Nazi propaganda. The emotions of children make good press. Hamas knows it and so does Britain’s The Independent.