At the moment, it appears that everything is very much back at square one on the Arab-Israeli peace front.

Mr. Kerry’s efforts in that area have only confirmed the depth of feeling all sides seem to exhibit whenever new settlement negotiations are proposed. The picture is a familiar one and prospects for changing it into something more upbeat remain obscure and their likelihood barely credible. This, as might readily be surmised, is not a good sign.

But time moves inexorably onward and so we must all await further developments, assuming that these are still winding their way down along some mysterious and very tortuous pipeline.

Waiting, however, does have its drawbacks. Much like a cancer eating away at the body, the measures taken to halt its progress and excise its presence must become ever more radical if the situation has not responded well to treatment in the past. Or if that treatment was never very effective in the first place.

And the record here shows that this has proven to be the case at almost every turn.

After some 65 years and more, options and opinions on how to remedy the matter may soon be reaching something of a crisis point, one where only the most drastic and cutting-edge of procedures can offer some hope for complete recovery. Or any recovery at all.

But it is good to know that finding a cure for what has surely been one of humanity’s most enduring maladies still has the possibility of coming true. A remote truth, it may be said, but still a valid and even a viable one.

If a job’s worth doing, then it’s worth doing well.