It’s 2015 and I am going to address an issue here that does not garner popularity among most and many good people with divergent opinions will have a hard time swallowing but it is all true:

It Is Time for a Wake-up Call (Again).

New immigrants have tremendous power and pull: a powerful resource that, unfortunately, goes unused. What a pity to waste such a wonderful group of people who come from strong ethical backgrounds and who could make a substantial difference in this country. If you are a new immigrant you should realize that you have the ability to influence and elicit change not only in the economy and in issues relating to consumer awareness, but also change in the quality of public services and, even more importantly, in our educational system.

 Parental Authority and Parental Control

Unfortunately, parents today walk around with a lot of guilt and uncertainty about how they should be educating their children without the know-how to put these ideas into practice. They feel guilty about the minimal time they spend with them, about not being able to provide them with all of the material goods their children “need”, and just from not seeing their children happy and content overall. It is time to stop feeling guilty and start being proactive by setting clear boundaries and expectations of our children.

Our society has no problem asking the police why they didn’t stop a certain crime, why they didn’t arrive at the scene of the crime on time, why the resources devoted to fighting crime is so minimal and so on. It is time for parents to ask why a 14-year-old child is alone in a park carrying knives. The time has come to place increased responsibility on the parents.

 Crime & Crime Prevention — The Legal and Educational System

We are currently witnessing a steady rise in the level of crime and criminal behavior not only in the overall number of cases being presented daily but also in the severity of the violence itself. Crimes relating to drugs, alcohol and other underworld activities exist and we as a society must take responsibility if we want to make a change and make it quickly. Blaming the system, the police or the government without accepting blame on ourselves is not productive or helpful.

The legal system, which includes lawyers judges, lawmakers and the police are always trying to find the best way to punish those who break the law. In alarming numbers the courts are busy sending parents to jail for slapping their kids or are taking children out of their homes and away from their parents when they have no other viable solutions. This, in and of itself, is a crime that the legal system is committing against us as parents when they are the ones we should really be relying on to protect us as parents.

Our parental role includes the responsibility to keep our children out of trouble, to give them material comfort, an education, good nutrition, etc. and despite all of the good we are required to provide them, we as parents are being deprived of the very basic, much needed tool of parental authority.

We are not allowed to use any kind of physical force of even the minutest nature to educate our children and if we are too harsh on our kids (by the standards of the legal system) they can call the police on us or the social workers (who at any time will most certainly enter the picture and may destroy the family core).

It Is Time to Make a Difference! How Do We Make It?

  • Exercise your right to vote for those leaders that we believe can make a change.
  • Write to the State Comptroller who has enormous influence in Israel.
  • File complaints to the Israel Consumer Council in every case you feel your rights were violated.
  • Involve, when necessary, the Ministry of Communications — the regulator of all cell phone companies, cable TV, etc. if you see the need.
  • Ask questions and demand changes from our Members of Parliament. They were elected by the people for the people. That means YOU!
  • Talk to journalists if you have a case and if you find the right connections.
  • Make phone calls and write letters to those you believe should be helping you and are not doing their jobs properly.

Words to the Wise

  • Do not be aggressive, but do not show fear.
  • Be very polite but be firm and assertive! Remember, you are not asking for any favors but are merely demanding what is your right to do by law.
  • Don’t give up, but do follow-up! Call as many times as you need until things are clear and you feel reassured. Civil servants are paid to serve the public and their survival depends on you, the public.
  • There is no need to run to the Israeli Parliament to make a change