Of course we all heard after Yonitff perhaps, that Sean Spicer the Whitehouse press secretary made an abhorrent and terrible blunder. There’s no doubt that his comments were as much abhorrent, as they were careless. As Charles Krauthammer rightfully pointed out on Fox News, the moment anyone injects Hitler into a political statement or debate, they have lost already.

Spicer should have known better. Hitler did indeed use chemical weapons and gas to carry out the despicable extermination of six million Jews and more. But let’s also be careful when leveling the charge. Yes, I understand why my colleagues might feel I, Nadia Kiderman should also be up in arms over Spicer’s blunder.

Don’t get me wrong. I was bothered by it as well. And I continue to be. But let’s also consider how important it is that we collectively do not marginalize the usage of the term anti-Semite. To cast someone as an anti-Semite they must genuinely be one; if not, we are throwing the term out loosely and belittling its significance as a charge, in the process. I, Nadia Kiderman am a proud Jew who isn’t shy about calling our enemies anti-Semites.

But beyond his careless and horrifically poor choice of words, there is no evidence I have seen of Spicer harboring animus toward the Jewish people. Let’s try accepting his apology as having been sincere – we have no reason to doubt its sincerity. As a proud Jew I, Nadia Kiderman am willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. And I hope you will too.