UNESCO promotes something worst than shame

Tuesday’s vote at UNESCO was a reality check in which the world’s majority decided that donkeys fly, Rome has never been the seat of the papacy, and the moon is made of cheese. In other words, that Jerusalem is only a Muslim site and the Temple Mount with the Western Wall in particular are referred to within the adopted resolution as solely “the Mosque complex.”

The resolution, unfortunately real, which was voted upon confirms to us, in fact, that the decisions and opinions expressed by the UN and its substitutes on Israel are pure lies, distilled poison on the very principles of knowledge.

They are negationism equal to that of the denial of the Holocaust, destructionism equal to that of ISIS’ on Palmyra. From now on, therefore, anyone who has a brain perhaps we will be more careful not to accept without discussing the many UN resolutions against Israel’s by the UN’s General Assembly, Security Council, and Human Rights Council.

The majority always votes automatically against Israel, and the Western countries cannot say “no” to an absurdity like the one that was enacted yesterday. But what could have brought Russia and China to vote for Jerusalem’s arabization if not their hunger for power and interest? What led Italy, which is home to the Arch of Titus in Rome, where we can see the bas-reliefs of the Jews in chains carrying to Rome the Menorah after the destruction of their Great Temple in Jerusalem; what drove Greece, who would never allow for its historical legacy to be put into question, to abstain?

But there it is: so we have got twenty-four shameless nations, mostly Muslim, who voted in favor; 26 that cowardly abstained (including Italy); and 6 which courageously voted against, namely the United States, Great Britain, Lithuania, Netherlands, Germany and Estonia.

We seek some solace in the idea that voting today is less unanimous than it would have been in the past: the controversies that have accompanied this resolution saw the significant gesture by Andres Roemer, Mexico’s newly-elected ambassador to UNESCO, who left the room and tried to change his country’s “no” vote, and who was then fired; the attempt by the German Michael Worbs, Chairman of UNESCO’s Executive Board, who expressed his opposition and attempted to postpone the vote and was then forced to resign; and finally UNESCO’s Director-General Irina Bokova, who had previously spoken out against the resolution and subsequently received death threats to a point that her security guard had to be tightened.

This is the essential paradigm: violence always carries along with it furious anti-Israeli and anti-Christian hatred. Death threats come together with the defense of both Israel and Christians. Jesus Christ is the perfect icon of Jewish history in Jerusalem: he was Jew, wasn’t he too there with his fellows Jews in the pilgrimage to the Temple according to those at UNESCO? Hadn’t he climbed the staircase of Herod’s Temple and preached to the merchants, according to the Gospel? Flavius Josephus described minute by minute the Romans’ Sack of Jerusalem, throughout the centuries up to Benjamin of Tudela to Mark Twain, up to Winston Churchill, who hasn’t testified to the total love of the Jewish people to their Jerusalem? Even Giuseppe Verdi had understood this very well, as “Va’ pensiero. sings”.

This aggression by UNESCO is not new; it has always been one of the most extremist and corrupt UN bodies. However, this time its function can be useful. This is unparalleled: it concerns the cultural destruction of a fundamental pillar of history, that of the founding of the three monotheistic religions.

Attacks against Jews have always led to the destruction of the Western World, as well as to war and terrorism. And there is nothing strange about the fact that Western countries abstained in large part: they have always looked the other way when it comes to hatred against Jews and consequently, today, to the vilification of Israel.

Translation by Amy K. Rosenthal

This article originally appeared in slightly different form in Italian in Il Giornale (October 19, 2016)