In the vast, uncultivated desert, the Israelites had an orderly method of encampment and travel – three tribes on each of four sides, north, south, east and west, each group with its own representative flag, all surrounding the Tabernacle in the middle.

Sometimes we feel that we are floating in this world, that the world is large and chaotic and it is unclear what our place is.   We feel lost in the desert.

This week’s parsha teaches that order and a sense of place in the universe come from our connection to God. If we place God in the center, if we are clear about this priority, then all else falls literally into place, ourselves included.   We have a part to play in a larger scheme.   We are no longer lost.

When we place God at the center, what happens is what happens in the beginning of Bamidbar – we count, we matter.    Rashi says that it is a sign of God’s great love for us that He counts us all the time.   We encircle Him, placing Him at the center, and He, in turn, gives us love and value – we matter in relation to God and once we know that, we feel secure in our place in the universe.

In less than a week we will be celebrating Shavuot, when we received the Torah.   It strikes me that the encampment in the desert was a replication of the experience at Sinai.   At Sinai, too, we surrounded God, at the foot of the mountain.     It is as if the desert encampment was meant to continue that experience, to continue physically our sense of God at the center, first in an awesome revelation, and then in the daily travails of life.

The Sefat Emet says that at Sinai we each saw our own root in God and our own part in the Torah.   We each understood that we have a part to play; we each felt the full weight of our own value; we counted.

The word for the census numbers is pekudim.   This root also has the connotation of appointments or assignments.    We were not just counted, but each given an assignment, each given a sense of our own worth in relation to God, a sense of our own part to play in the divine scheme, a sense of “place” so that the world no longer feels chaotic and random but ordered and purposeful.