Mr. Abbas has been reported as saying that, if this next round of US brokered peace negotiations collapses – as they are often minded to do – then all options are open

If this does happen, might the following be considered one of these options, a scenario that could bring about a ‘de facto’ form of peace to all sides and in every eventuality?

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What advantages are there in this?

I.  It has totally autonomous function.

There is no need for elaborate political ritual, second guessing about what the other side is thinking or how it intends to proceed; both sides will be occupied with the very same thoughts. The process is self-contained, absolutely transparent and without possibility of reversal or cancellation.

2. It is self-sustaining.

Once activated, it cannot be switched off or collapse like a normal peace process. It just stays there, running continuously in the background, cycling and monitoring a situation that is most definitely in need of much careful observation.

3. It is specific to one, single primary task.

Its sole purpose is the establishment of a unique form of peace. As such, it operates within fairly narrow parameters and will respond only to certain stimuli. All other inputs it ignores completely.

4. It is demonstrably unbiased.

It remains completely immune from whatever political or military agenda is currently being espoused by any individual, group or nation

5. It costs virtually nothing to set up, organise and maintain.

The information fed into it involves no high order of financial outlay and that which is taken from it is equally cost conscious. In other words, it would be the cheapest form of conflict insurance on today’s market.

But there must be some disadvantages?

Only one really. And that involves a considerable expenditure in the brain cell department.

This requirement is necessary to get everyone’s head around the concept of a type of peace that needs no negotiation prior to its commencement.

And, if Mr. Abbas has his fears realised about Mr. Kerry’s latest initiative, then even the radical peace plan detailed here may be more than welcome in the aftermath of yet another familiar failure.