I believe it was 7 p.m. when I gave up and headed to the barista to order the fifth espresso shot of the day. Fashion Week has been hectic (duh!) and between one show and the other, I even managed to head to Bar-Ilan University to attend a couple classes.

The schedule of Day 2 featured interesting shows by Gadi Elimelech and Sample, yet the evening was the highlight of the day, with two of the most awaited shows of the event. After having a very Fashion-Week-style dinner — they serve us a large selection of salads in the press room, forgetting that we are journalists, not models — I had a chat with Katie Hession, a Canadian blogger who’s covering the Week for her Yow City Style Tumblr page. Later on I met Vogue Italia’s stylist Alessandro Buzzi. It’s his first time in Tel Aviv. I asked him what struck him the most. “The people,” he answered.

Simone Somekh (left) with Vika Kanar and Alessandro Buzzi (Simone Somekh)

Simone Somekh (left) with Vika Kanar and Alessandro Buzzi (Simone Somekh)

While checking for interesting outfits on the red carpet, an Israeli woman approached me.

“Are you a journalist?” she asked, pointing at my press pass. She wanted to make sure I was going to the Yaron Minkowski show. “His daughter is 14 years old and she’s opening his show with her own collection,” she said.

I was wondering why she was so concerned I would go and cover it.

“She’s the youngest designer to showcase here,” she added. “And I’m her mother.”

Now everything was clear! I smiled, touched by her pride.

Ori did indeed open her father’s show presenting a tween, bubblegum pop, colorful collection. One of the pieces was designed for the Israeli athletes competing in the Olympic Games. “I love sports and was really unimpressed with the uniform the Israeli athletes wear. Hopefully one day they will wear the one I designed,” she told me backstage afterwards.

Ori Minkowski's collection (Simone Somekh)

Ori Minkowski’s collection (Simone Somekh)

The atmosphere changed drastically as Yaron Minkowski’s designs made their way to the catwalk. Yaron chose the Hunger Games’ soundtrack to create a dramatic vibe for his crochet, pastel cocktail dresses. There was one which was cut in the middle and reminded me of Taylor Swift. A series of pieces made with a keffiyeh — the traditional Middle Eastern scarf, which today has become a Palestinian nationalism symbol — was presented, and the audience remained silent. Some thought that showcasing such symbol in the midst of the ongoing wave of terror attacks carried by a number of Palestinians in Israel was out of place. Yaron, however, claimed that he’s “for peace.”

Yaron Minkowski at Gindi Tel Aviv Fashion Week 2015 (Simone Somekh)

Yaron Minkowski at Gindi Tel Aviv Fashion Week 2015 (Simone Somekh)

Yaron Minkowski's keffiyeh at Gindi Tel Aviv Fashion Week 2015 (Simone Somekh)

Yaron Minkowski’s keffiyeh at Gindi Tel Aviv Fashion Week 2015 (Simone Somekh)

The venue was packed for the last show of the day — Marcelo Burlon was the only international designer at the event and he flew into Israel with a massive crew from his County of Milan.

Marcelo opened the show with a contemporary dance performance. Only after 20 minutes of dancing we started seeing the actual pieces of the collection, which were badass as always, but did not feature much innovation in terms of concept and style. Marcelo is a world-renowned brand and therefore loves to put on a big show, even if it means sacrificing the fashion for the general artistic experience, the result of dancing, music, and vivid scenography.

Right after the end of the show, head producer Motty Reif announced that all guests were invited to the lounge for a party. “Marcelo is playing,” he said.

I grabbed my bag and hopped on the first cab I found, not affected by my multiple espresso shots at all.

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