In the latest chapter in my continuing JPost blog, Antisemitism and Jewish Survival a reader, The Auschwitz Decision, while appreciating the risk to Jews in the Diaspora, yet does he still cling to at least the United States as possible exception to the danger. But what is gained by faith in “possible” exceptionality when the stakes are our very survival measured against the weight of historical evidence to the contrary? 

Commenter: David, you ask, “How, in the age of secularism where “conversion, etc.” has little value to Christian (secularized but still overwhelmingly “Christian”) society
can we still believe that there is even the possibility of disappearing, be absorbed, into the Diaspora?” Your point is well taken.

In the past, the era that I referred to in my comment, I saw Jews trying to assimilate into Christian society. However, I think that may no longer be the case. Today, escapist Jews are striving for citizenship in a “One World”. They fantasize that there will be no anti-Semitism in the “One World”, because they will no longer be seen as Jews, but rather, as “One World” citizens.

The idea that they will no longer be seen as Jews in the “One World” is absurd. The principal proponents of a “One World” are in the universities and in the United Nations, both notably anti-Semitic. The fact is, their “One World” won’t like Jews any more than the present world does.

I hope that the US remains a country where Jews can freely practice their religion, acquire education, own property, engage in commerce and live in security. As you have pointed out, there certainly are some causes for concern. In my view, Israel is the key to survival for the Jews. It is tiny, and it is surrounded by enemies. Its principal “supporters”, the US and Europe, have never shown up in Israel’s time of need. The current leader of the US has shown a propensity to readily turn on his “friends”. In the face of all of that, it really is
Israel’s nuclear capability that has enabled it to survive. Therefore, I think that Israel needs to chart a course for survival that recognizes the true circumstances that prevail, and not the mythical ones.

DT: The “One World” you refer to, “Commenter”, goes back theoretically to Marx and Hess, later to Luxemberg, etc, and earlier to Napoleon and before that to the earliest Church. All posited the disappearance of the Jews as a surviving entity. As far as Jews asserting “One World” as solution to the Jewish Problem, as you yourself point out, “their “One World” won’t like Jews any more than the present world does.”

Which suggests you understand the underlying dynamic of the Jewish Problem, and its compulsion to achieve a final solution.

But then you fall back on Idealism in suggesting the exceptionality of America: “I hope that the US remains a country where Jews can freely practice their religion, acquire education, own property, engage in commerce and live in security.”

It seems to me, “Commenter”, that “One World” and “American Exceptionality” are identical. How do see Jews living in a Christian secular world, regardless of such accoutrements as the Constitution and Bill of Rights, American Justice (the Pollards, the Rosenbergs?) that are flexible to mean just about anything (Supreme Court reinterprets continually) or disregarded according to political expediency.

The Jewish Problem is the guts of Christianity (read Ruether: Faith and Fratricide) the unconscious motivator of that religion’s secular inheritors (the Shoah). It is precisely this “wish” beyond reason, “Commenter”, that I warn about: Jewish Denial.