The Nobel Prize for this, that and the other appears to be generating quite a respectable number of column inches these days.

Various papers, periodicals and the news media in general seem more than eager to detail just who the recipients are and the sterling contributions they have made in whatever is their chosen field.

One such category, that of Peace, may even have the Iranian president in the running. Stranger things have happened but surely not all that many.

And yet, ever since 1901, well over a century and 124 awards later, (125th to be decided this Friday), peace itself still seems a very distant prospect in so many parts of this troubled world.

What is needed, therefore, may be an all-purpose, all-inclusive approach, one where the petty squabbles of national and vested interests are essentially nullified in favour of a much more active and unstoppable drive towards universal peace.

Exponential curve

The only slight drawback to such a concept is that, afterwards, the issuing of further peace prizes becomes somewhat redundant. In a world where every conflict would be capable of producing its own form of peace, what room is there left for any additional work on the subject?