Who Stole My Religion?:

  • Generates interest and discourse on the future of Judaism and our imperiled planet because of its challenging analyses.
  • Delivers a critical analysis of Orthodox Judaism’s views on climate change and politics.
  • Argues that vegetarianism, and especially veganism, is the diet most consistent with Jewish teachings and is essential to efforts to avert a climate catastrophe.
  • Offers a possible viable solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • Provides a radical approach to reducing terrorism.
  • Discusses how to reduce anti-Semitism and the current demonization of Islam.
  • Praises socialism as the economic system most consistent with Jewish teachings.
  • Explains why tikkun olam – the healing and proper transformation of the world – should be a central focus in Jewish life today.
  • Urges the application of Jewish teachings in response to crises.
  • Presents several approaches to revitalizing Judaism.

Expansion of reasons:

  • The provocative title, “Who Stole My Religion?’ will generate interest and start many dialogues on the future of Judaism and of our imperiled planet.
  • The book, while extolling Orthodox Jews for acts of charity, kindness, and learning within their communities, is critical of them for generally being in denial about climate change and backing politicians whose views conflict with some basic Jewish values.
  • The book has the potential to be a game changer, bringing the issues of veganism, animal welfare, environmental stewardship, U.S. foreign policy, socialism, Islamophobia, and others onto the Jewish agenda and treating some issues already on the agenda, including anti-Semitism and prospects for peace in the Middle East, with a perspective not generally considered.
  • The book is a strong wake-up call to the urgency of applying Jewish teachings in response to current crises.
  • The book argues that Judaism is a radical religion, in the best sense of the word, because of the challenging words of the biblical prophets and the powerful Jewish teachings on peace, justice, compassion, sharing, and environmental sustainability.
  • Contrary to the prevailing dietary views and habits in the Orthodox community, the book argues that vegetarianism (and even more so veganism) is the diet most consistent with Jewish teachings on preserving human health, treating animals with compassion, protecting the environment, conserving natural resources, helping hungry people, and pursuing peace.
  • The book shows why major shifts toward vegan diets are essential to efforts to avert a climate catastrophe and other environmental disasters.
  • The book argues that tikkun olam, the healing and proper transformation of the world, should be a central focus in Jewish life today.
  • Consistent with the views of many Israeli military and strategic experts, the book argues that Israel needs a comprehensive, just, endurable resolution of her conflict with the Palestinians in order to avert continued and possibly increased violence and diplomatic isolation and criticism, effectively respond to her economic, environmental, and other domestic problems, and to remain a Jewish and a democratic state.
  • The book argues that democratic socialism is the economic system most consistent with basic Jewish teachings about compassion, justice, sharing, and environmental sustainability.
  • The book provides a radical approach to reducing terrorism, arguing that the U.S. should acknowledge the degree to which its policies have helped radicalize some Muslims, and should try to change our international image by spearheading a global Marshall-type plan to sharply reduce poverty, hunger, illiteracy, illness, and other societal ills, thereby reducing the incentive for terrorism.
  • The book discusses several approaches to revitalize Judaism, helping to bring many disaffected Jews back to a much more exciting, relevant Judaism.
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