Qatar: Small, but dangerous

Qatar has supported terrorism in Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Libya, Tunisia and Egypt, and has spent huge amounts of money in support and funding of jihad groups and terrorist activities in Europe and elsewhere in the West. Qatar has supported jihad terrorism in order to gain a foothold in some Arab and regional countries, so as to counterbalance its small size and relative weakness, as well as its lack of any political or military weight in the Middle East. Indeed, Qatar has succeeded in penetrating some countries by means of terrorism and aiding in the formation of armed terrorist groups such as al Qaeda in Syria and Iraq, destabilizing security. Qataris also purchase political power and influence, furthering the Qatari dream of being a regional power, or at least giving the illusion of being one.

The main supporter of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt was Qatar. The resounding fall of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and the insistence of the Egyptian people on getting rid of the Muslim Brotherhood regime has had a great impact on the psyche of the Qatari regime. This, in turn, has had a very negative effect on Qatar’s policies towards Egypt and other Arab countries that have rejected the Muslim Brotherhood’s terrorism, and who have also worked to eradicate it from that region and the world.

Qatar’s support for jihad terrorism became a political ideology that seeped into Qatari military, security, diplomatic and even charitable institutions. This has led to an unprecedented increase in the spread of jihad terrorism in the region, accompanied by the emergence of many jihad terrorist groups under the support of Qatar, which provides them with funds and weapons. This has prompted other Arab countries to boycott Qatar in order to stop its terrorist activities, which have violated the security and stability of the region.

Qatar-funded Muslim Brotherhood activities in Europe, meanwhile, have promoted Europe’s Islamization. Qatar’s solidarity with Iran and its coordination with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards (which is designated as a terrorist organization by the United States), the Quds Force, and the Iranian intelligence have worked to undermine the security and stability of the neighboring Arab countries in particular, and that of the entire world. Qatar’s activities in support of terrorism in the Gulf region and worldwide continue.

Qatar also supports the activities of notorious anti-West activists Linda Sarsour and Ilhan Omar, for example, and in an attempt to exploit poor youth, it recruits them for terrorist organizations such as the Houthis in Yemen, Hezbollah, and Iraqi sectarian jihadist militias, as well as for the remnants of the Islamic State (ISIS), in order to destabilize national security, especially in Egypt and Saudi Arabia, in retaliation for isolating Qatar and its ally, the Muslim Brotherhood. Qatar has hampered progress and development in the Arab anti-Muslim Brotherhood countries by targeting security and stability, striking at their relations with the world, and trying to target their interests and investments. This has become one of the main reasons for Qatar’s support for jihad terrorism.

Qatar has become an ally to Iran and its proxies, as well as of Erdogan’s Turkey and the Muslim Brotherhood. Qatar has become a tool of Iranian terrorism and Turkish interventions, and a financial tool for Turkey’s proxies in Europe. Because of its alliances with Iran and Turkey, it has now become a dangerous security risk for Arabic countries and the world in general.

Why is Qatar important to the United States? Simply because of Al Udeid Air Base, which is one of the most important US bases in the world. It is used by other US allies for military operations, such as the United Kingdom and Australia during the Gulf Wars and operations in Syria. Qatar is a tiny, rich state which pays for US lobbyists and US politicians to influence some of the policies of the US. For example: “Qatar has spent $16.3 million lobbying the U.S. in 2017, compared to $4.2 million in 2016, in an attempt to lobby about 250 people who can influence President Trump’s foreign policy.”

Qatar. Small, but dangerous.

this article was originally published by Rami Dabbas in Circanada.com & JihadWatch.org

About the Author
Rami Dabbas is a Civil engineer by profession, pro Israel advocate,political activist speaking out against terrorism and Writer for several media Outlets. He was born in 1989 in the City of Astana during the Soviet era to a Jordanian father and a Russian mother.
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