Danny Bloom
I seek the truth wherever it lies.

This 11-year-old UK girl’s 20-second climate protest video will break your heart

Meet Iris, the 11-year-old British girl who whose brief climate protest video will break your heart. It’s just 20 seconds long and if you have a few moments in your busy day, take a look here at the YouTube clip of her uploaded from a European news site.

I don’t know about you, but her words — and emotions — broke my heart. I’m a veteran climate activist and I’m used to seeing powerful climate protest speeches by scientists and politicians from around the world. But Iris won my heart. She broke my heart. She has my heart now.

You?

This is the moment caught on a brief 20 second video clip that an emotional 11-year-old girl broke down in tears during a recent climate change rally in the UK.

Her name is Iris and she was one of the youngsters who was speaking at an outdoor public protest in Truro, south-west England, when it all became too much for her.

“I love our planet and I don’t want it ever to stop,” said Iris, with other children surrounding her outside county hall in the Cornish city. “If we do want everything to stop then we’re going the right way about it at the moment.”

“This isn’t good,” she added, beginning to cry.

The youngster was one of thousands taking part in nationwide demonstrations calling on the British government to do more on global warming.

It was part of a burgeoning European movement that has seen protests in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland and now also in Australia, France, Canada and the USA, and also in Japan and China.

They were inspired by Swedish student Greta Thunberg, now 16, who has been skipping school every Friday to protest about climate change in front of the Swedish parliament and who is already being talked about for a Nobel Peace Prize this year in October.

This video is priceless. Do watch it one more time and leave a comment below.

About the Author
Danny Bloom is editor of The Cli-Fi Report at www.cli-fi.net. Danny graduated from Tufts University in Boston in 1971 with a major in Yiddish Literature. A newspaper editor and reporter since his days in Alaska, Japan and Taiwan, he has lived and worked in 14 countries and speaks French, Japanese and Chinese. He hopes to live until 2032, when his tombstone will read "I came, I saw, I ate cho-dofu."
Comments