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Carolyn Weiniger

What ‘stay safe’ looks like

Most people from abroad who contact in the past weeks since the terror attack on Israel on Oct 7th send a message to “stay safe”.

I am grateful for every message but I want to reflect for a moment what “stay safe” looks like.

This is what “stay safe” looks like.

It looks like sending our sons and daughters to battle, having them return from trips around the world to join their army unit, leave their jobs and homes without a moment’s thought and go to wherever they are supposed to be to defend Israel.

It looks like defeating Hamas wherever they may be and this means currently where they are hiding among Gazan civilians and Gazan hospitalized patients, so calls for a ceasefire will not help us stay safe.

It means stocking up the safe-room (mamad) with food and water and a bucket to enable prolonged stay.

It means buying or making a special contraption to be able to seal closed the mamad door so it cannot be opened from the outside.

It means sending our sons and daughters to war in Gaza, an independent piece of land mastered by the Palestinian people, a place that should be a beautiful EU and USA funded oasis in the Middle East, that has become a terror base the likes of which has not been seen before.

It means sending our sons and daughters to the northern border for an unlimited time, while the army decide whether to allow Hezbollah to provoke while we respond, or to respond to end the provocation.

It means finding a special moment every so often to empty my soul of grief so I can do my job with compassion and joy (I am an Obstetric Anesthesiologist).

It means connecting with friends and colleagues for a chat, an unburdening, a cry because to keep it all bottled up inside “until the end of the war” is not a good idea, this grief has to be relieved.

It means asking people “how are you” and being able to hear how they are and share how I am.

Thank you for your wishes and your messages to “stay safe”

What else can you do?

Contact the red cross International Committee of the Red Cross – ICRC, the United Nations, your parliamentary representatives, the Vatican.

Call out antisemitism wherever you see it.

Amplify strong voices.

Stay in contact so we know we are not alone.

And help us stay safe.

About the Author
Prof Carolyn Weiniger is an obstetric anesthesiologist in Tel Aviv Medical Center and Tel Aviv University.
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