Can meanies be Kosher?

What does Kosher mean?

The idea of Kosher is rather ambiguous, especially when it comes to foods.

Some say that certain foods need to be blessed by a rabbi.

Others say that certain foods like salmon, gefilte fish, vegetables and rice are already Kosher and there’s no need for any blessings at all.

Although the whole idea of Kosher is confusing, there are some obvious things in Judaism which are either Kosher or not.

For example: everyone knows that eating pork or mixing dairy and meat is never, ever Kosher

Also, you’re never supposed to work on Shabbat, or gossip about another Jew, and blah, blah, blah, you get the point.

But what happens when someone is very sick  and the only way they will get healthy is if they ate pork?

What are they supposed to do?

Bloody hell, are they just supposed to eat the damn, stinking pork?

Well, according to Judaism, they just got lucky; because that pork has become automatically Kosher if it’s for a life or death purpose.

If the only way this person is going to live is by eating that pork, then there isn’t anything non-Kosher about that pork, period. 

If someone doesn’t fast on Yom Kippur, due to a health condition, then their not fasting is perfectly Kosher. 

Basically, almost anything that you would have to do to preserve your own life or someone else’s, automatically becomes Kosher, even if it’s ordinarily absolutely not.

Now, what happens when someone suffers from severe chronic pain, and because of that, complains all day?

What if they also happen to gossip?

What if they are mean to everyone around them?

Are they permitted to be verbally abusive towards others?

Is their rudeness Kosher because they are in emotional and physical pain and 

the only thing that comes out of their mouth is negativity?

I’ve been thinking about a lot of the people in my life who used to be very mean to me.

Many of them had physical health problems.

Is it Kosher to be mean in some circumstances? 

Well, I don’t know.

It’s just a random thought. 

Maybe they can’t help it. 

So, the next time you see someone being mean, ask them if they’re in pain, because their rudeness might be Kosher. 

About the Author
Anat Ghelber was born in Israel and moved to Texas when she was 13. There, she experienced anti-Semitism in public schools. She moved to New York City when she was 20. She is currently studying for a Bachelor of Arts in Social Work. She started submitting articles to the Jewish Voice 2 years ago, and in her free time enjoys writing poems.
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