Color-Coordinated

If I see a vase and it’s clearly purple, you can try to convince me with every argument in the book, the most compelling logic, the most heartfelt emotional appeals, but you’re never going to get me to sincerely agree that it really is blue….

Unless you pull the red-lensed sunglasses off my eyes that I wasn’t aware I was wearing.

Nor will you ever convince me the blue jacket in the picture I printed really is purple…unless you restore the red ink to my printer that I hadn’t known had run out.

Much of the world today is missing more than a color; it is missing an entire dimension. The result of this is that perceptions are distorted yet make full sense based upon the incomplete picture that is shown.

“I wish I could see what you do,” said an older man, half marveling at and half mocking my then newly adopted spiritual lifestyle. “But I just don’t.”

He was right. And it wasn’t his fault.

Sometime back, before any of us were born, the forces of history had somehow excised from Western man the basic age-old understanding that there is a spiritual dimension beyond the physical and quasi-physical dimensions of space and time.

More importantly, perhaps, the knowledge that this spiritual dimension interacts with and impacts our lives and world events in a real-time way was purloined.

And most important, that we constantly make choices that propel us either forward or backward in the spiritual dimension – with all its concomitant life and world changing impact – whether we are aware of these choices or not.

While this all might sound like nonsense, I promise you it’s true.

But why should you believe me, when the vase is clearly purple…

And the jacket’s clearly blue?

About the Author
Nesanel Yoel Safran, US born and a graduate of Brandeis, now living with his wife and family in the Judean Hills, is a writer, chef, and a teacher/student of Jewish spirituality. He blends these assorted vocations on his blog, Soul Foodie, where you can join him on mystical cooking adventures and glean practical wisdom for the kitchen — and for living.
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