Exceptionalism

As much as I am embarrassed, shocked, roiled and in every other imaginable way turned off by the presidency of Trump, the economic disputes with China are a fascinating and courageous effort of regaining fairness.

They are less about make America great again and more like stop China from stealing. No other country in modern history has so consistently relied on theft and deceit to promote its economy.

The Chinese industrial complex is the epitome of piracy on land. I am talking about transfer of intellectual property that has resulted in decades now of trade deficits. Even the trade deficits are bearable; America can take it. But to steal our ingenuity, that which is at the very core of our national, feels like a personal attack.

And to tell the truth you are attacking my neighbor, my friend, my classmates and even my family. I wont let you.

In a weird manner the American people as a whole remind me of the Jewish people. No not physically, but by the character of soul. Always resilient, smart and resourceful you cannot eliminate the American. Down for the count it seems, and he rises and wins. I sometimes wonder in amazement at the consistent ingenuity and the spirit of self-preservation.

And this is the one reason as well, that a Donald presidency can never turn out in utter disaster. I don’t know how we got him, it’s really befuddling, but as Dan Coates famously said “you will disappear in the dustbin of history” and America will great despite you.

OK, now back to this Jewish connection. Perhaps it’s because I am a member of both groups, but the similarity of in spirit and resourcefulness is inescapable in comparison.

So take pride in exceptionalism, be proud as Jew, and watch the rest of the world pass by.

About the Author
Born in Romania to Holocaust survivor parents, Dr. Gabriel Mayer reached the US, after his family escaped Communism, reaching Italy, and as refugees, was supported by the Jewish Agency. He grew up in New York and attended college and medical school in Boston, at Boston University. He spent the first half of his working life as a medical doctor, professor, clinician and researcher in the USA [Professorships at University of Florida and Boston University medical schools]. A distinguished accomplishment of Dr. Mayer and his team was the introduction of thrombolytic therapy to treat acute myocardial infarction; this was the first team in the world to publish research based on clinical work. These procedures have lasted until the present and have saved millions of lives. In 2013 he began his studies at the University of Haifa, earning back-to-back MA degrees in Holocaust Studies and Israel Studies. Currently, he is focused on Judaism, and Jewish personhood/peoplehood and the Diaspora and Israeli discourse as driven by academic and philanthropical energies. For two years (2015 & 2016) he served as Head Historian of Martef Hashoa Museum, Jerusalem.
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