I stood on a public street in my flip-flops, taking a video of Hezbollah flags fluttering in the centre of London, as Al Quds march organisers tried to block my view.

A police officer came over, and I thought he’d speak to me about stewards trying to censor me. Instead, he told me to mind my toes because of all the cars and buses going past.

Another policeman, scribbling notes throughout the demonstration and with a CCTV camera on his outfit came over. He told me I was wise to be carrying a bottle of water in the 30 degree heat.

There’s a certain sense of helplessness, when Hezbollah’s terror flags fly in my city, and police are more concerned with my well-being.

Everyone has the right to protest, but carrying the flag of a proscribed terror group should be beyond the pale in one of the most modern, liberal, tolerant cities in the world.

We wouldn’t accept ISIS flags fluttering down New Bond Street, yet as I stood in the middle of the road, facing a barrage of screaming demonstrations, there was a sea of yellow flags, branded with AK47s. The terror flag of Hezbollah.

Each flag had a carefully worded sticker on it that read: “This flag is to show my support for the political wing of Hizbollah,” following advice from the organisers of the march, Islamic Human Rights Commission.

The flying of terrorist flags happened because of political malfunction. There has been an abject failure to recognise that not even Hezbollah distinguishes between its political and paramilitary wings. They are one and the same — anti-Semitic terrorists.

Lots of people blamed the police and Sadiq Khan (even though it’s not within his remit) for this march’s brazenness. The reality is it took place because it was legal.

The law must be changed.

#AlQudsDay march 2017

Posted by The Jewish News on Monday, 19 June 2017

#alqudsday march live from London

Posted by The Jewish News on Sunday, 18 June 2017