Tzemach Yehudah Richter
Tzemach Yehudah Richter

Remembering The 9/11 And Kabul Attacks & The Rabbi’s March On Washington D. C.

בסייד

For everyone planning on attending the 9/11, 20th Anniversary, a notable change has been made from past years. This may not be easy to discover at first when looking at the 9/11 Memorial & Museum Site at the following link-

https://www.911memorial.org/connect/commemoration/20th-anniversary-commemoration

But an article on Fox News from August 14 points this out quite clearly.

The Heading reads – “9/11 Memorial Excludes First Responders, Survivors On 20th Anniversary”.

The Sub-Heading – “The 9/11 Memorial & Museum is inviting only relatives of the victims”.

Credit for the article is given to Susan Edelman of the New York Post.

The article points out that “Thousands have flocked to Ground Zero to pay homage on previous anniversaries, including firefighters, cops, EMS workers and other first responders, all joining family members in the audience “.

This year, the 9/11 Memorial & Museum sent the usual invitations to the relatives of the victims saying, “The ceremony will be exclusively for 9/11 family members.”

Only family members are invited,” said memorial spokeswoman Lee Cochran. “The invited family members can bring as many additional family-member guests as they’d like”. Cochran insisted that nothing is new this year.

Sally Regenhard, whose firefighter son, Christian, was killed on 9/11, said responders and survivors should all be welcome.

Tim Frolich, a Fuji Bank employee whose foot was crushed while escaping the dust cloud when the South Tower collapsed, credits two Port Authority cops and a firefighter with bringing him to safety. He believes such heroes should be invited to the 9/11 ceremony.

Frank Siller, CEO of the Tunnel to Towers Foundation, whose firefighter brother, Stephen Siller, was killed on 9/11, said first-responders and survivors should not be turned away.” Just because it’s 20 years later doesn’t mean you‘re completely healed,” he said. “They want to pay their respects and honor their heroes. I think they should be allowed down there.”

Moments of silence mark when a plane hit each of the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and a field in Shanksville, PA, and when each tower fell.

The pandemic scuttled the tradition last year, when memorial officials, bowing to COVID-19 concerns, decided they would not bring together anyone to read the names, using a pre-recorded recitation instead.

For All Those Wanting To Participate But Were Not Invited –

A Second Memorial On September 13 Should Be Planned

Because September 11 will fall out on Shabbat this year, those Jews who are Shomer Shabbat and who were invited most probably will not attend.

I therefore suggest a second alternative ceremony be scheduled for September 13. In this way, all those not invited or who will not attend because it is Shabbat can then participate in this additional ceremony.

But of far greater significance, September 13 on the Hebrew calendar is the 7th of Tishrei. That corresponds to the same day on the Hebrew calendar the Rabbis March took place or three days before Yom Kippur in 1943.

The number 13 also corresponds to the number of US Servicemen and Women killed in Kabul during last week’s terrorist attack. The attack was carried out by another terrorist group which is operating right alongside members of the same group responsible for the 9/11 Attack 20 years ago.

This may be very short notice to organize such a memorial, but I feel the families of all those men and women who gave their lives serving their country in Kabul should be invited to speak, which will not interfere with the September 11 ceremony.

In addition, all relatives of those trapped behind enemy lines should also have a chance to speak.

What is taking place in Kabul today appears to be very similar to how the Nazis treated the Jews in Europe when the Rabbis tried to meet President Roosevelt. But this time it is the Americans and those that helped them that are all in danger.

Americans must now speak out and not be silent.

 

About the Author
Born and raised in the Minneapolis suburb of St. Louis Park. Married to a South African, we lived in Johannesburg from 1979 to 1996. Made Aliyah with our seven children on Parshat Lech Lecha. BSB Accounting Degree from the University of Minnesota. Investment Portfolio Manager /Fundamental And Technical Analyst. Wrote in-depth research on companies, markets, commodities for leading financial publications. Served in the US Army Reserves Semi Retired spending quality time with my wife, children, grandchildren and attend Kollel while analyzing current events as they relate to Torah and Mitzvahs.
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