Ariel Katz
Ariel Katz
Grant Thornton Israel

Time to contribute to an IRA

U.S. one-hundred dollar banknotes are arranged for a photograph in Hong Kong, China, on Monday, April 15, 2019. China's holdings of Treasury securities rose for a third month as the Asian nation took on more U.S. government debt amid the trade war between the worlds two biggest economies. Photographer: Paul Yeung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Saving in an IRA comes with tax benefits that can help you grow your money

It can pay to save in an IRA when you’re trying to accumulate enough money for retirement. There are tax benefits, and your money has a chance to grow. Every little bit helps, and you can still put money into an IRA for the 2020 tax year.

If you are employed in the States, in Israel—or you’re self-employed—an IRA may make sense.

Here are some reasons to make a contribution now

1. Put your money to work

Eligible taxpayers can contribute up to $6,000 per year, or your taxable compensation for the year (whichever is less), to a traditional or Roth IRA, or $7,000 if they have reached age 50, for both tax years 2020 and 2021 (assuming they have earned income at least equal to their contribution). It’s a significant amount of money—think about how much it could grow over time.

Consider this: If you’re age 25 and invest $6,000, the maximum annual contribution in 2020, that one contribution could grow to $89,847 after 40 years. If you’re age 50 or older, you can contribute $7,000, which could grow to about $19,313 in 15 years. (I used a 7% long-term compounded annual hypothetical rate of return and assumed the money stays invested the entire time.)

The age you start investing in an IRA matters: It’s never too late, but earlier is better. That’s because time is an important factor when it comes to compound growth. Compounding is what happens when an investment earns a return, and then the gains on the initial investment are reinvested and begin to earn returns of their own. Even if you start saving early and then stop after 10 years, you may still have more money than if you started later and contributed the same amount each year for many more years.

2. You don’t have to wait until you have the full contribution

The $6,000 (or your compensation limit) IRA contribution limit is a significant sum of money, particularly for young people trying to save for the first time.

The good news is that you don’t have to put the full $6,000 into the account all at once. You can automate your IRA contributions and have money deposited to your IRA weekly, biweekly, or monthly—or on whatever schedule works for you.

Making many small contributions to the account may be easier than making one big one.

It’s important to note that you don’t have to contribute up to the limit each year. Save what you can on a regular basis—even small amounts can make a big difference over time.

3. Get a tax break

IRAs offer some appealing tax advantages. There are 2 types of IRAs, the traditional and the Roth, and they each have distinct tax advantages and eligibility rules.

Contributions to a traditional IRA may be tax-deductible for the year the contribution is made. Your income does not affect how much you can contribute to a traditional IRA—you can always contribute up to the annual limit as long as you have enough earned income to cover the contribution. But the deductibility of that contribution is based on your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) and the access you and/or your spouse have to an employer plan like a 401(k). If neither you nor your spouse are eligible to participate in a workplace savings plan like a 401(k) or 403(b), then you can deduct the full contribution amount, no matter what your income is. But if one or both of you do have access to one of those types of retirement plans, then deductibility is phased out at higher incomes. Earnings on the investments in your account can grow tax-deferred. Taxes are then paid when withdrawals are taken from the account—typically in retirement.

Just remember that you can defer, but not escape, taxes with a traditional IRA: Starting at age 72, required minimum withdrawals become mandatory, and these are taxable (except for the part—if any—of those distributions that consist of nondeductible contributions).  If you need to withdraw money before age 59½, you may be hit with a 10% penalty unless you qualify for an exception.

On the other hand, you make contributions to a Roth IRA with after-tax money, so there are no tax deductions allowed on your income taxes. Contributions to a Roth IRA are subject to income limits.  Earnings can grow tax-free, and, in retirement, qualified withdrawals from a Roth IRA are also tax-free. Plus, there are no mandatory withdrawals during the lifetime of the original owner. If you need to take an early withdrawal from a Roth IRA, withdrawals of earnings before age 59½ may be subject to both tax and early withdrawal penalties if withdrawn before the qualifying criteria are met.

As long as you are eligible, you can contribute to either a traditional or a Roth IRA, or both. However, your total annual contribution amount across all IRAs is still $6,000 (or $7,000 if age 50 or older).

What’s the right choice for you?  Our U.S. tax team at Grant Thornton Israel can discuss the options with you and assist in planning an effective retirement plan.  Please feel free to contact us at 03 710 6644 or ariel.katz@il.gt.com

About the Author
Ariel Katz CPA is an expert in United States taxation and accounting at Grant Thornton Israel. Mr. Katz focuses on individual, corporate, and non-profit companies, and advises many companies in the area of tax structuring and planning. Mr. Katz is highly involved in academic teaching and professional training. He conducts various activities, including: Senior lecturer in the accounting department in the field of corporate taxation and partnership taxation at the College of Management Academic College. His hobbies include learning Torah, chess, bicycle riding, and running.
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