Cindy Grosz
#cindyscorners

Leket Event, Chocolate, Cheese and Spice News With Cindy’s Corners

Cooking For A Tasteful Cause

Photo: Amy Stopnicki

For me, food and tzedakah are a tasteful blend. On March 12, Amy Stopnicki, best-selling author of Kosher Taste, will be doing a cooking demo to raise money for Leket. Leket Israel is one of the largest food rescue organizations. It was started in 2003 by Joseph Gitler.

It sources and collects food, which would otherwise be considered waste, from farms, hotels, military bases and catering halls and distributes to non profit organizations that provide nutritious food to Israelis.

The fundraiser is tied with an organization locally called Living Jewishly. They have been arranging some of the food being prepared at the event to be given to families to be eaten the following day.

It is so special to be involved in such a great program, tying Israel, local Jews and food!

Photo: Amy Stopnicki
Photo: Amy Stopnicki From Kosher Taste

https://www.amazon.com/Kosher-Taste-Cookbook-Prepare-Plate/dp/1680250329

Vegan Chocolate

TRŪ Chocolate® is good for your entire body. It is natural sweetened, gluten free, dairy free, vegan and has won multiple awards for taste. TRŪ Chocolate® is enhanced with our proprietary phytonutrient blend, and gives you the pure taste of an all-natural, ultra-high quality dark chocolate. The company maintains the highest standards on the planet and proudly guarantees that TRŪ Chocolate® has no gluten, no GMO’s, no dairy, no sugar, no fillers, and no preservatives.

Since the company’s beginning back in 2009, the goal has been to create the Healthiest Chocolate Snacks in The World, snacks that could impact people’s lives. To meet their goal, they needed products that not only tasted great, but were truly beneficial to every human being including the 50% of the population that either has diabetes or diabetic tendencies.

https://www.amazon.com/TRU-Chocolate-Gluten-NON-GMO-Natural/dp/B01EI7XGWY

Pesach Cheese and Spices

If you are like me, you eat lots of cheese Pesach and never find one that tastes really good. Not this year!!! Vermont 12 month Artisan Cheddar by “The Cheese Guy” is already getting great reviews from food distributors and tasters at special events. It’s also Chalav Yisrael.
“The Cheese Guy” artisan cheddar has a subtle, sharp, savory bite with lingering fruity notes to balance the bite. It’s a Farmstead cheese made from cows that are pasture raised in The Green Mountains of Vermont. It is aged over one year, vegetarian (no animal rennet or other animal enzymes), hand-made in small batches, gluten free, OU – Kosher for Passover and Chalav Yisrael.

It tastes best paired with apples and honey, a full bodied, dry Cabernet Sauvignon, a Chardonnay or a hoppy IPA.

Order directly from here:
http://blockandwedge.com/

Spices for Pesach — Focus on Paprika

Pereg Natural Foods has over thirty varieties of spices available for Pesach, including several types of paprika.

Every Passover, I update my spice collection and always buy paprika. I remember making roasted chicken for Seder with my grandma rubbing it on the skin and loving the color on my fingers.

It’s the world’s fourth-most consumed spice. Paprika goes way beyond adding color to deviled eggs. It appears in rubs, marinades, stews, chilies, and numerous cuisines. Without paprika there would be no Mexican rice. No Hungarian goulash. No Italian sausages. Let’s be honest: who wants to live in a world like that?

All paprika starts life as a type of red Caspicum annum, otherwise known as the bell pepper. Paprika can be smoked, sweet, hot, Hungarian, or Spanish style, depending on the variety of the peppers used and the way it is processed. Color can range from bright red to brown.

Each type of paprika has its own flavor profile, from mild to spicy. That’s why Pereg offers six different varieties to choose from. Most are Kosher for Passover. Check your labels before purchasing.

Mediterranean Extra Sweet Paprika: The most commonly used paprika is made from sweet red peppers, making for a spice that doesn’t have much heat at all. Instead, its flavor is fruity and a little bitter. Sprinkle this darker colored paprika on deviled eggs or use it to make classic Hungarian dishes like goulash.
Hot Paprika: Adds just the right amount of heat to pasta, tomato dishes, Moroccan fish, hummus, goulash & and creates a beautiful color to any dish.
Hot with Oil Paprika: This variety of paprika is made with spicy red peppers (the hot don’t stop even if it’s dried).  Spicier and livelier than sweet paprika, this variety gets even more intense when you heat it up with butter or oil.
Sweet with Oil Paprika: The fresh red pepper is rich in Vitamin C and increases blood circulation. With the added oil, it enhances the flavor and aroma. Add to pasta, tomato dishes & Hungarian dishes. Adds splash of color to any dish.
Smoked Paprika: This gourmet quality paprika is far superior to the bland Hungarian or domestic varieties available at your local supermarket. The fresh pods from the mild Nora pepper are smoked over oak logs to develop the flavors. This technique brings out different aspects of the peppers complex flavor, thus we suggest trying out at least two different varieties in your cooking. Peppers smoked over an oak fire develop into a rich complex palate which is much more powerful and pronounced than in our sun-dried varieties.  Use this paprika to develop rich flavors on meat and seafood dishes.

https://www.pereg-gourmet.com/

Food, Fun, Family and Friends…Everything Food In Recipes and Restaurants From Cindy’s Corners

Cindy Grosz can be reached at cindyscorners@gmail.com

About the Author
Cindy Grosz is an accomplished activist for pro-Israel and Jewish interests. She writes about “Everything Jewish” and has appeared in multiple media outlets. She is a Contributor on The Jersey Joe Radio Show on WOR710AM, syndicated through iHeartRadio. Grosz is the author of Rubber Room Romance, Everything You Need to Know and Ask About the Education System. She can be reached at cindyscorners@gmail.com.
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