This Is The Immigrant Holocaust

When I first heard about the separation of Mexican families who were crossing the border illegally, the first first thing I thought of was the Holocaust.

World War II is happening again.

(Or perhaps I should say, World War III.)

I went into total mental shock hearing about this.

How is it possible that in this day and age, we are dehumanizing another race like this?

How is it possible that we are moving on with our lives as if nothing is happening, because something terrible is happening.

Little boys and girls are being separated viciously from their parents.

These little boys and girls are like any other children. 

They long for their parents to hug them, and read them nighttime stories.

There are little girls there who dream of having their mother at their wedding someday. 

(You know, the usual things that kids think about.) 

Between October of 2017 and May of this year, at least 2,700 children have been separated from their parents and are at the mercy of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, ending up God knows where, it seems.

They may never see their parents again. 

Can you imagine the little girl who cries hysterically for her mother and father, wondering where they are? 

Imagine the little girl being physically taken away from her parents.

Imagine that little girl screaming, “No, Mommy, you can’t leave! You promised me that we would always be best friends, and stay together forever.” 

Picture the little boy who wants to grow up and make his father proud. 

What if you were that little girl or little boy being taken from your parents like that? 

How would you feel? 

How would you feel if somebody took your kids away from you, far away so that you would never be able to see them? 

When the Holocaust started in 1933, parents and kids were separated like this. 

I learned from my beautiful grandmother how it was a trauma that she would never forget. 

My grandmother was sent to a concentration camp with her mother and father.  She told me the horror story about how she was in her father’s arms when the Nazis approached them.

She said how they forced open his arms and she fell onto the ground and they separated her father from her. 

Who would know that something like that could happen? 

In school, I learned that the reason why we have to learn about the Holocaust is so that history doesn’t repeat itself. 

I think a lot of Jews, whose parents and grandparents have survived the Holocaust, have a fear that it will. 

So, here I am pronouncing the Holocaust is happening again, right here right now.

It may not be a full-blown Holocaust, but it is a partial Holocaust. 

I will not say that Trump is acting like Hitler, but I will not deny it either. 

There is a difference between making people obey the law so things can be orderly, and abusing those who are not following the law, which is what Trump did, in my opinion.

He abused those who broke the law. 

Is this really where we have gotten to? 

Is child abuse allowed because people decided to break the law? 

I really believe that they could have been more logical and reasonable and sent the families back intact, instead of separating them. 

Of course, that would have been more humane. 

To take a child from their mother is a different way to kill the mother.

To take the mother from the child is a different way to kill the child. 

Do you expect those children to somehow heal down the line?

It’s very, very unlikely, this will happen. 

I am so sorry for those poor families.

I am angry, because I wonder how, as Jews, we are blind to the fact that Trump is always ingratiating himself with us so he can try to stay in power, and stay ahead of the game. 

Trump is acting as if he likes Jews, because his daughter is Jewish and his grandchildren are Jewish.

Well, what can I say?

He’s a good businessman.

Well, as a Jew, I say, “Trump, I don’t buy your crap!”

About the Author
Anat Ghelber was born in Israel and moved to Texas when she was 13. There, she experienced anti-Semitism in public schools. She moved to New York City when she was 20. She is currently studying for a Bachelor of Arts in Social Work. She started submitting articles to the Jewish Voice 2 years ago, and in her free time enjoys writing poems.
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